Featured What to Plant in MAY in Australia for Winter

Discussion in 'Tropical Climate Only' started by ClissAT, May 8, 2020.

  1. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,765
    Likes Received:
    840
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    This post will cover every zone in Australia for both flowers and vegetables. People in other southern hemisphere countries could also use this list as a broad guide.
    I always like to plant flowers as well, whether they are dedicated companion types, bee and insect attractant or simply colourful.


    Flowers for Cool and Temperate Climates
    Alyssum, Aurora Daisy, Cineraria, Cornflower, Cyclamen, English Daisy, French Marigold, Iceland poppy, Lobelia, Lupin, Pansy, Polyanthus, Primula, Snapdragon, Stock, Strawflower, Sweet Pea, Viola.

    winter companion planting flowers1.jpg

    Flowers for Subtropical Climates
    Ageratum, Allysum, Candytuft, Carnation, Dianthus, Everlasting Daisy, Iceland Poppy, Impatiens, Marigold, Sweet Pea, Viola.

    winter companion planting flowers2.jpg


    Flowers for Tropical Climates
    Ageratum, Aster, Balsam, Crysanthemum, Coxscomb, Coleus, Cosmos, Dahlia, Dianthus, Petunia, Portulaca, Salvia, Sunflower, Torenia, Verbena.

    winter companion planting flowers3.jpg

    Vegetables for Cool and Temperate Climates
    Beans, Beetroot, Broad Beans, Broccoli, Cabbage, Capsicum, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celeriac, Chicory, Endive, Garlic, Herbs, Jerusalem Artichokes, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Onion, Silverbeet, Potatoes, Tomato.

    winter garden.jpg

    Vegetables for Subtropical Climates
    Artichokes, Asparagus, Beans, Broad Beans, Broccoli, Capsicum, Cauliflower, Celeriac, Chicory, Coriander, Endive, Garlic, Herbs, Jerusalem Artichokes, Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Raddish, Shallots, Spinach, Sweet Potato, Tomato, Turnip.

    winter greens.jpg

    Vegetables for Tropical Climates
    Beans, Beetroot, Broccoli, Cabbage, Capsicum, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Pumpkin, Shallots, Squash, Sweet Potato, Tomato, Zucchini.


    winter vegetable 1.jpg


    Vegetables for Arid Climates
    Artichokes, Asparagus, Broad beans, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Peas, Spinach, Sweet Potato, Tomatoes, Turnips.

    winter fruit1.jpg


    Fruits to plant now in most Climates
    Raspberries, Rhubarb, Strawberries,
    Try Rock Melons and Watermelons (you might be lucky this year with not much rain forecast!)

    winter fruits 2.jpg


    If you live say in SE Qld, you could plant any of the subtropical or tropical veg or flowers and even try the Cool Climates ones too if you have a place that doesn't get too much sun in winter so it stays a bit on the cool side. Maybe it's on the southern side of your house or perhaps you live in a flat or unit and your balcony is on the southern side.

    I live in SE Qld and I plant all of the vegetables listed for winter. Nights at my place are generally 20-25degrees cooler than the days. The temperature begins dropping around 3pm and stays low until around 8am next day which enables the amount of chill factor the cool climate plants need. But mostly the days heat up quite a bit so the tropical plants still get some heat on their leaves.

    If you live in an Arid zone try everything!

    If you live in Victoria you probably wouldn't bother about anything on the Tropical list because you will get good hard frosts down there. Unless you have a nice hot protected corner where frosts won't settle. Or perhaps you live in a flat or unit with a protected north facing balcony, in which case go for the tropical and subtropical vegetables.

    If you can't exactly remember what a plant looks like, google it.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  2. AndrewB

    AndrewB Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2018
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    Albury, NSW
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    I'd hold off on the tomatoes & potatoes for a few months in cool/temperate climates unless you are happy to protect from frosts.

    Great time for everything else on the list though.
     
  3. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,765
    Likes Received:
    840
    Location:
    Pomona, Qld
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Yes, Andrew, that's correct.
    However, I'd like to think most people have several warm microclimate spots in their gardens where they can fit maybe one plant of each.
     
  4. GKW

    GKW Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2019
    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Sydney
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Got to admit that the missus badgered me into planting some "Tommy Tee" tomato seedlings she had cultivated in here green house. I've got a place in the yard that gets the morning and arvo winter sun so planted out 10 odd in pots....and much to my surprise they are going great guns. Still pre-frost (well not that many frosts in Sydney in the main) but surprised none the less as the remaining seedlings are not growing.

    If I get some toms mid year I'll be most happy.
     
  5. Richard Buchanan

    Richard Buchanan Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    1
    Climate:
    Sub-Tropical
    Im in Brisbane what about Ginger. I love ginger and want to give it a try. Do you just buy some ginger in the shops and grow those?
     
  6. AndrewB

    AndrewB Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2018
    Messages:
    219
    Likes Received:
    109
    Location:
    Albury, NSW
    Climate:
    Temperate (all seasons)
    Ginger loves heat, so will do better in late spring/early summer.

    You can just buy it from the shop & plant it, get organic & local though. Imported stuff is usually irradiated to kill bugs & won't grow most of the time.
     
    • Like Like x 1
Loading...

Share This Page