Veg Showcase Tomoto - Yellow Cherry

Other Names
Sun Sugar Tomato
Basic Growing Tips
Grows in most soil conditions, Can be grown all year (under certain conditions), Best grown in warmer conditions, Heavy feeder - likes lots of compost & appropriate fertiliser, Grows best in full sun, Heirloom variety
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Mark

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Staff member
May 27, 2012
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Bellmere, QLD
www.selfsufficientme.com
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Sub-Tropical
Mark submitted a new Showcase Item:

Tomoto - Yellow Cherry

The yellow cherry tomato is an amazing plant and is one of my "fall-back" tomato plants I grow in our subtropical garden because it will grow strong and reliably when other tomatoes don't.

Fruit can get up to golf ball size and its slight acidic tang makes the yellow cherry great in salads, sandwiches, open melts, or perfect in general cooking.

The plant itself is indeterminate, which means it grows like a vine, and will sprawl out over a trellis beautifully. Clusters or fruit aren't big at around 6 per truss but overall the trusses are plentiful so productivity is awesome!

Due to the size and acidity the Queensland fruit fly will not touch the fruit and the plant is extremely disease resistant to things like blight, and target spot.

I generally don't have to save the seed from this variety of tomato as it pops up throughout our garden regularly from naturally fallen fruit so the plant is either transplanted or simply left to grow where it came up.

I definitely recommend the yellow cherry tomato for the home garden.
Read more about this showcase item here...
 
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Ken W.

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Premium Member
Mar 17, 2015
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Inglewood, QLD
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Temperate (all seasons)
I grow or I should say, I allow to grow by themselves the Yellow Currant tomato. It sounds very similar to the Yellow Cherry except the fruit only grow to about 12mm round. They are prolific bearers and as I said, they grow by themselves and thrive on neglect. They're the only tomato I can grow here without fruit flies attacking them. They make a delicious snack as I'm working around the garden and are great in a tossed salad.
 

Mark

Founder
Staff member
May 27, 2012
5,066
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411
Bellmere, QLD
www.selfsufficientme.com
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Yeah the current tomato variety is terrific also, I mainly see the red ones self seeding in our garden.

Fruit fly don't touch any of the cherry types of tomatoes in our garden including the larger varieties like Tigerella and we have a lot of fruit fly in our area.

I grow the larger tomatoes in winter here and although the plants suffer a bit from the cold temps we still get fair crops of beefsteaks, romas, etc without fruit fly damage but as soon as spring hits any larger tomato varieties get smashed.

Feel free to submit your own review Ken if you've ever grown this type...
 

Flatland

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Oct 18, 2016
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Should I admit I just can't come at tomatoes that are any other colour than red? Maybe not you might accuse me of being colour prejudice
 
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Shannon Robinson

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Feb 7, 2020
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Should I admit I just can't come at tomatoes that are any other colour than red? Maybe not you might accuse me of being colour prejudice
Me, either. Well, not yellow. I do like purple and black tomatoes. Every yellow Tom I've tried was mealy. My kids love when a volunteer yellow pear cherry type comes up on its own. They use them as bombs in their own version of snowball fights. We don’t get snow.
 

Meran

Member
Feb 18, 2020
2
1
15
Brisbane
Climate
Sub-Tropical
I wish the fruit fly around my place were that fussy, they attack my cherry tomatoes quite happily. I have both red and yellow growing at the moment, any that I don't bag get stung.
 
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Meran

Member
Feb 18, 2020
2
1
15
Brisbane
Climate
Sub-Tropical
Yes I saw that. I was just planting tomato seeds yesterday for planting in the cooler weather, both cherry (yellow and red) and larger varieties.
I was hoping the cherry tomatoes would fare better in summer, and they're getting a decent amount now that I'm bagging them, but I was away for 5 weeks in January/early February, and fruit fly had a field day on the tomatoes, capsicum and chillies, and unfortunately I wasn't around to clear up the stung fruit.

As for being hard to accept tomatoes being yellow, try the green zebra tomato, that seems even stranger eating them green!