The Quest for the Everlasting Wattle: A Guide to Edible and Inedible Acacias

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Hi JP

Respect, I think acacia seeds are such an important potential food source.

I made some notes on the potential toxins in them a couple of years back when I was reviewing the research.

My understanding is many species were not eaten traditionally.

Some toxins have been found in the seeds of some species including:

Two toxic amino acids:
  1. djenkolic acid (this can lead to kidney failure, but so far in ones tested not at dangerous levels)
  2. S-carboxyethylcysteine and albizzine (these were found in non-dangerous quantities in some known edible species, affects the metabolism of the sulphur amino acids)
Protease (inc. trypsin and a-chymotrypsin) inhibitors (these prevent digestion of proteins and I think are likely present in all acacia seeds, but can be destroyed by cooking)

Refs:

Go well! Adam
 
Hi JP

Respect, I think acacia seeds are such an important potential food source.

I made some notes on the potential toxins in them a couple of years back when I was reviewing the research.

My understanding is many species were not eaten traditionally.

Some toxins have been found in the seeds of some species including:

Two toxic amino acids:
  1. djenkolic acid (this can lead to kidney failure, but so far in ones tested not at dangerous levels)
  2. S-carboxyethylcysteine and albizzine (these were found in non-dangerous quantities in some known edible species, affects the metabolism of the sulphur amino acids)
Protease (inc. trypsin and a-chymotrypsin) inhibitors (these prevent digestion of proteins and I think are likely present in all acacia seeds, but can be destroyed by cooking)

Refs:

Go well! Adam
Very helpful, thank you! I'm still a long way from even posting page one of this project, but my photography of various species is gradually increasing.
 
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