The Market Gardner Series(earns $140000)

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Kasalia, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. Kasalia

    Kasalia http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/ Premium Member

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    Found this video series very informative, especially the part on succession planting part 10 I think. He works 1 1/2 acres only by hand.
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    Also The Whizbang Gardner has an interesting way for a garden diary that will work much better for me, so I paid the $3US for the pdf and set my book up.His videos are great too, he has a few blogs as well. Ended up buying both these guys their books for my kindle, much cheaper, and enjoyed them. I am always learning things, just wish I had more land but then again it comes with youth also.
    http://thedeliberateagrarian.blogspot.com.au/2016/02/how-to-keep-simple-logical-useful.html
     
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  2. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Both interesting. The journal is a good idea and I like the idea of things being grouped by plant than dates, that's how I operate, keeps all the info together. Even though I used pen and paper to take notes, having things on electronic devices and being able to share that info between each device is a good idea and what I am currently sorting out..

    There are several apps that do that. One I am trailing is Gardenate, it's made by Australian, but can be used world wide. You can select your climate zone, you can add the plants that are in your garden, when you planted, harvest dates, notes, etc, look like you can even take photos and share it between your devices. Has general information on how to grow on many different plants. They also have a website where you can find planting information and when to plant for your specific area.

    You can set calendar reminders for harvesting but not for when you fertilized, watered, pruned etc to then get reminders or notifications of when that was next due. I am currently using Google Calendar to keep track of when I last fertilized and reminds me in the set time I have indicated. There is an app for that too but the one I came across was a bit limiting.

    The guy I got my veggie soil from ours a small farm he has been growing produce on and sells surplus out the front of his own or at a local festival once a year. He told me how much money he was making, there is certainly money to make in selling fresh produce or even a bit of extra pocket money to cover your own expenses.
     
  3. Kasalia

    Kasalia http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/ Premium Member

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    I use Gardenate all the time for planting and I did try the garden thing @ letsgo, then I joined GrowVeg.com for 2 years, which is good for designing the garden, but it is getting to the computer that I find hard. I must be a visual hands on, I would rather a book planner . I have several different planners and have set myself up a desk from an old singer sewing machine table.
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Quite interesting - although not totally original as small acreage farming has been around forever really... until large farming took over.

    The resurgence in small acreage farms and backyard farming for personal use (like many of us are practicing) is exciting to see and now with the Internet it's easy to find inspiration to gyo and be less reliant on big ag.
     
  5. Kasalia

    Kasalia http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/ Premium Member

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    I liked the way he worked backwards based on quantity needed per week, and the time it takes to develop seed to full plant, therefore giving you a date to use per week/month for a planting schedule, and his use of occultation covers and light tilling application of compost. His intense farming like 5 rows of carrots to a 30 inch wide bed etc. amazing. Lots you can learn for the home garden.
     
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  6. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yes, a lot can be said about challenging traditional spacing methods of growing vegetables and fruit.
     
  7. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Many row spacings were set so 1 or 2 horses could do the plowing.
    Or so an old Massey Ferguson or Farmall with wide steel wheels could drive down the rows.
    When it came to hand farming, the row widths & plant spacings were set for much bigger & taller plants. Heritage carrots used to grow to above knee height & needed up to 30inch row spacing. They could grow with the roots almost touching each other along the length of the row but needed the extra row width due to leaf height & bulk.
    The traditional spacings we are used to mostly came from British gardens that grew very different varieties. As varieties have changed to suit Aussie conditions, most books have not changed row/plant spacings.
    However you might see that the spacings written on the seed packets are now much closer. But you will only know that if you grow from seed.
     
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  8. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Now that's pretty interesting gardening trivia! I learn something new every day :)
     
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