Soil Quality question

kaltemrix

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Hi all!

So last weekend I posted about my new tomato raised bed. They seem to be doing well so far, however this weekend I'm intending on planting beets along the front of them.

The beds are filled with soil we got from Nuway (link below)

We haven't done anything else to the soil as it says it already has composted organics in it, however I'm wondering if anyone knows whether or not I should add more compost/manure to it?

Thanks in advance all :)
 

Mandy Onderwater

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I don't know your specific brand, but mine works like a charm without any additions.
This video of Mark might help you tell if your soil might need a little extra or not!
 

kaltemrix

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Thanks for the video suggestion!

I'm pretty sure it's the same one Mark used in his recent video filling the large beds, however he also added humus, and had some large organic stuff at the bottom, which I have not.
 

Mandy Onderwater

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Thanks for the video suggestion!

I'm pretty sure it's the same one Mark used in his recent video filling the large beds, however he also added humus, and had some large organic stuff at the bottom, which I have not.
If you're worried you could always add some. You could also buy a soil tester if that's what you might look for.
I tend to check my soil, and if it seems decent enough I'll grow in it. I'll add fertiliser as I go :)
 

LeahB

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When I add bits of wood, etc, to the bottom of beds, it's to serve three purposes;
1. As it breaks down, it'll provide nutrients in the years to come
2. Wood holds moisture well, great to help provide water to plants in drier periods
3. If I'm using prunings and other bits of scrap wood it's a lot cheaper than just straight soil/compost, and a great way of getting rid of prunings while retaining the nutrients in them

So, while useful, wood isn't necessary to provide nutrients to the plants in the first year of gardening in that space.

I generally prefer putting compost into beds in the place of a soil mix but I reckon a soil mix should hold everything your plants need for a season of growing. Though I don't believe that either tomatoes or beetroot are the kinds of plants to dislike overly fertile soil so I don't think there's any danger in adding more nutrients to make extra sure if you wanted. Though, in saying that, I think you'd want to avoid additives that a particularly high in nitrogen as that has the potential to prompt the tomatoes to focus more on leaf production than fruiting.

(Disclaimer, I'm speaking from only a little bit of experience, and an awful lot of reading/watching)
 
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