Question Self sufficient survival > wasps

bizhat

Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
38
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
---- solved

These (warm) days, whatever I do outside, be it pruning the plants, fixing a wall or just mind my own darn business, wasps keep getting in my face trying to tell me all about how I should be joining their Church of Wasp Witnesses.
Today I've discovered a nest in one of my composts.. I usually wouldnt care, but it's near a neighbour who've got a young kid - and I dont want him converted (+I'm kinda allergic; my hand is swollen like a Jap. pumpkin atm)

Sooooo... what measures do u guys use to keep wasps at bay?

note:
not these guys:
qqqqqqqqqq.JPG


but these guys:
wwww.JPG


thanks
 
Last edited:

spector

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Joined
Jul 15, 2020
Messages
119
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
Good luck. I have paper wasps, and they are generally pretty benign. They buzz around me while I am in the garden, because they like the same foodstuffs as the bees, and there is water out there, but I have yet to be stung by one. Yellow jackets, OTOH, are mean little SOB's. I have a friend who has a rural property, and he is always fighting the fight. He has wasp traps out and cans of wasp killing spray at the ready, and he still gets wasps every year. I have tried the bait stations in the past, but have never found one that I think is worth the cost.
 

bizhat

Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
38
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
He has wasp traps out.
I want to try to keep the massacre as natural as possible..
online, I'm seeing lots of trap instructions (mostly some sort of sugar water w/ soap) -- any thoughts on that?

> last night I stuck a waterhose in the compost and drenched it..... yeh. that didnt help, if anything, they are more active now repairing the damage.
> am thinking of tumbling the compost (it's one of those quick composters in a plastic hull) tonight and spreading the contents, with the hopes to disperse the buzzing contents ----- anybody got experience if that's a smart or awfully dumb thing to do?

I think they are European Paper Wasps, so there should not be immediate danger, yet I want to get rid of that nest asap.
I've already got massive issues with having built my wonderful high-bed right between two lilac trees that are being frequented by about 50 hornets at any given time (yes, yes; they are not harmful if u leave them be: I call bs!)
 
Last edited:

spector

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Joined
Jul 15, 2020
Messages
119
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
If they are paper or mud wasps, they should leave after you destroy their nests. You might have to do it 2-3 times to discourage them. I *think* paper wasps have several queens, and each queen will just hide out and then start a new nest, so vigilance is key. I get paper wasps up in my eaves, and since my house is three stories high, I get a high pressure nozzle and soak from a safe distance. They will come back almost immediately after the first destruction, probably because a lot of them were gone when I hit the nest. Usually, twice will be enough to discourage them and get them to move on.

If you put out a drowning type trap and use sugar, you will also trap/kill all other flying and pollinating insects. Some wasps (including hornets) are attracted by meat, and the best trap I have heard about uses a piece of raw shrimp. Once it gets well and truly rotten, it should attract the meat-attracted wasps but the bees and other nectar-only eaters won't even investigate. I don't know if paper wasps fall in that category, unfortunately.

Some of the commercial wasp traps are natural, using a pheromone attractant to bring the wasps in, and then they can't get out and drown/die in the container.
 

bizhat

Member
Premium Member
GOLD
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
38
Climate
Temperate (all seasons)
tried the sugar water + soap, 4 bottles; not a single casualty -- perhaps I am impatient... or the fresh apple waste from the juicer is more attractive (d'oh).
Thanks for the very helpful tips.
> I'll trash the pile tonight and convert it to my backyard compost.
(in a hurry b/c the infested compost is right under our elderberry tree which is quite ready. it'd be a huge bother to not have that harvest).
 
Top Bottom