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Roasting your own coffee.

Discussion in 'Food - Cooking, Preserving & Fermentation' started by Tim C, Aug 29, 2014.

  1. Tim C

    Tim C Two heads are better than one Premium Member GOLD

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    Here is a little pic pres of how I roast my coffee- camera 048.jpg
    Green beans from beangreen.com, on the Companion stove- outside- lots of smoke and husks will soon be flying... camera 045.jpg
    Notice the husks everywhere... This is in near-full heat. You need to shake every 10-20 seconds. The lid (missing) is a glass one that fits inside the frypan, avoiding accidental spillage and allowing ongoing inspection. camera 046.jpg
    Shiny and nearly doubled in size. Shake-a, Shake-a Shake-a, all the time. camera 047.jpg
    Cool quickly. The baking dish is cocked up to allow air underneath as well (lid pictured in top left) camera 044.jpg
    The finished product- not as even as the store bought stuff, but far superior. This lot is PNG Robusta, Indian Tiger Mountain (Arabica) and Costa Rican Rio Negro (Arabica). Straight PNG or Indian Elk Hill Robusta will make the hairs on the back of your neck stand up! I sleep through it all right, but it is as strong as speed to most.
    I cannot even stomach the so-called "best" instant coffee any more (e.g. Moccona), preferring tea these days.
    I put the beans through a small vitamiser. camera 049.jpg

    Boil some water. Put one coffee scoop (about a level dessertspoon) per cup into my old billy, and pour the appropriate amount of boiling water in. camera 050.jpg

    Give it a stir, let it sit for 2-3 minutes, another stir and most of the granules will sink. Put milk and/or sugar in a cup then pour the coffee through an old tea-strainer. Once cold just zap the cup, or re-heat in a stainless or enamel pannikin. You don't want to keep the coffee pot/billy hot, or it quickly goes stale.

    No thousand dollar machines, or fandangled techniques. I also have a little cappucino frother. So many people wrongly put milk in these. You use water, and it is used to heat the milk. I have used powdered milk for years, and this suits especially for a cappucino. Use the luke-warm/cold coffee. Add sufficient milk powder to strength then froth with the cappucino frother. Milk powder means you can make it as rich as you like, to taste. On an off-topic, powdered milk is also ideal for home-made ice-cream, just substitute the cream in the recipe for milk made up to evaporated milk strength, along with the milk-vanilla-sugar-gelatine. Or whatever fruit/puree. Self-sufficient who? Self-sufficient You. When you buy the green beans you can keep some aside to propagate. Soak in water overnight, then sew in acid-rich soil or Camellia/Azalea mix. (Keep your coffee-grounds to acidify your soil)
    Also off-topic Carob seeds can be ground or boiled to make an emulsifier/thickener in place of gelatine.That should be OK for the greenie-objectionists, and other anaemic, soy-sucking alternatists. The types that do us all no favours by their militant and ignorant thought-trains...with their shortened digits, short-sighted opinions, and decayed DNA sequences......
    Lateral thinking peoples, not blind following of the IVF lemmings.....
    I'll have a Soy Latté thanks.. and knock-my-socks-off!
    (Sorry Mark...I just had to have a dig at the end..!) Time to play the banjo and check the greenie traps. My dogs have one bailed up, so I better go and put it out of its misery. God-forbid, I don't want them to bite 'im- they might catch some city-disease....Bloody Greenies...Nearly as bad as them Banana-benders-Ay!
     
  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    That's a great step by step way to make/roast coffee without expensive appliances Tim.

    Do you ferment your coffee beans or have these ones been fermented already?

    I have two coffee plants in pots atm my uncle gave them to me earlier this year are they best planted in full sun or part shade and how big do they grow? Acid rich soil... do you think they'll grow ok under a couple of large pines?
     
  3. Tim C

    Tim C Two heads are better than one Premium Member GOLD

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    Na Mark. I had coffee plants up near Tibooburra, but they were only babies. I have that many seeds to plant here, I haven't got to the coffee yet- getting about 20 new veg/herb varieties every week lately. Between clearing and burning and doing my Cert2 Horticulture, the coffee has been put on the back-burner-so to speak. I have way too much excess organic matter to compost it all.
    I am unsure whether I will wet or dry process my beans when I eventually grow some. The fermenting is just to remove the fruit from the bean/seed. It can also be dried then abraded off, i.e. dry processed, but that results in some broken/chipped beans. Beangreen have such a wonderful and affordable variety anyway. Just swigging on a cup of the new blend-Jeez that PNG Robusta is strong stuff ! Even mixed at 1/3 with the Arabica, the hairs are standing up on my neck!
    Part shade for the plants, from my studies. They should do alright under/leeward of the pines up there. Size will depend on variety and soil. 2-3 metres maybe?? Lee-Mika would probably have a better idea.
    As for the propogation, I'm reasonably confident that the wet processed beans will still germinate, as their dormancy would not have been broken.
     
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  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I thought the fermentation of coffee beans had something to do with the final product taste but there ya go hey - just a way to remove the husks!

    I might put my coffee plants down the back then and see how they go... the soil is definitely acidic and it's in part shade.
     
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