Pumpkin Problems

Fergzter

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Hi All

For the first time in years I have been growing a set of pumpkins from some old seed I had laying about (Gold Nugget from memory). Now I have been having a few issues with several of the pumpkins going yellow and croaking it. See attacched images.

For context this bed got a bit of young compost thrown in it a while back and a few random things came to life, notably tomatoes and some pumpkin looking plants... that could be anything similar, zucchini, cucumber... I wonder if my problems are cross pollination or somthing else. Also this area gets about 15min of drip line irrigation on a timer each day. It also gets a dose of worm juice every other week or so.

Also for context, we are located in Ballarat, which is in Victoria and we have had some very hot weather of late but the plants have not looked distressed at all.

Many thanks

Andrew
 

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Wedgetail

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Hi Andrew at a guess I would say they weren't pollinated were there both male and female flowers on at the time?. Do you hand pollinate or leave it to nature? I hand pollinate all mine and get very good take. You will soon know when the plants need a drink there leaves fold down and they look very sad. Hope this is of some use. Dave
 
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Fergzter

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Left it to nature :)

Maybe I need to get more flowering plants happening in my garden. The rest of the veggies seem to pollenate just fine.
 

Wedgetail

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If you can do the flowers early you have a better chance beat the ants etc. Barry helps to bring powdery mildew. Dave
 
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tommy bjerke

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Also of note pumpkins and melons are heavy feeders since they are only able to get nutrients and water from one set of roots. Fertilize heavily where the vine comes out of the ground and water there also. Helps to pinch off side shoots that are producing also since the roots can only support so much.
 

Fergzter

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Also of note pumpkins and melons are heavy feeders since they are only able to get nutrients and water from one set of roots. Fertilize heavily where the vine comes out of the ground and water there also. Helps to pinch off side shoots that are producing also since the roots can only support so much.
Good to know. I will make sure to get some seasol on them later today.
 

ClissAT

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I'd just like to add that you can force the plant to develop more roots by covering the leaf nodes and branching points with soft slightly moist mulch. Roots will quickly form under the mulch. So if you plan it right you can have a set of roots feeding each new fruit.
Allow the main runner to grow and branch. It will set lots of male flowers then once the nutrition and moisture are right it will begin setting female flowers.
Once the fruit has pollinated, cut off the rest of that side branch and cover the terminal with the mulch.
You will then have a set of roots feeding that one new fruit.
By that stage the next female flower on the next branch off the main runner will be opening.
 

Fergzter

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I'd just like to add that you can force the plant to develop more roots by covering the leaf nodes and branching points with soft slightly moist mulch. Roots will quickly form under the mulch. So if you plan it right you can have a set of roots feeding each new fruit.
Allow the main runner to grow and branch. It will set lots of male flowers then once the nutrition and moisture are right it will begin setting female flowers.
Once the fruit has pollinated, cut off the rest of that side branch and cover the terminal with the mulch.
You will then have a set of roots feeding that one new fruit.
By that stage the next female flower on the next branch off the main runner will be opening.

Wow I didnt know that. I might experiment with a few side shoots.
 

MichaelSchonefeld

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I'd just like to add that you can force the plant to develop more roots by covering the leaf nodes and branching points with soft slightly moist mulch. Roots will quickly form under the mulch. So if you plan it right you can have a set of roots feeding each new fruit.
Allow the main runner to grow and branch. It will set lots of male flowers then once the nutrition and moisture are right it will begin setting female flowers.
Once the fruit has pollinated, cut off the rest of that side branch and cover the terminal with the mulch.
You will then have a set of roots feeding that one new fruit.
By that stage the next female flower on the next branch off the main runner will be opening.
Great tips .. never knew that either
 

tommy bjerke

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Feb 7, 2020
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I'd just like to add that you can force the plant to develop more roots by covering the leaf nodes and branching points with soft slightly moist mulch. Roots will quickly form under the mulch. So if you plan it right you can have a set of roots feeding each new fruit.
Allow the main runner to grow and branch. It will set lots of male flowers then once the nutrition and moisture are right it will begin setting female flowers.
Once the fruit has pollinated, cut off the rest of that side branch and cover the terminal with the mulch.
You will then have a set of roots feeding that one new fruit.
By that stage the next female flower on the next branch off the main runner will be opening.
I have seen this happen myself but didn't know you could force it to happen. I thought it was just an anomaly. One great tip!