Native Bee workshop - 11 August - Qld AU

stevo

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This will be run by Tim Heard, a well known crazy native bee fella. If you're not in to native bees then it could be pretty boring for you. I have a native bee hive so I am going to this to learn more, and find out how to split hives.

Date
11 August 2013
Time
9.30am - 3.30pm
Location
CREEC Environmental Centre - 150 Rowley Road, Burpengary
Cost
$30.00 per Adult
Contact
Moreton Bay Regional Council
Ph: (07) 5433 2122

or book online here: http://www.moretonbay.qld.gov.au/general.aspx?id=8589939266
 

Mark

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Good find!

My uncle is somewhat of an expert in native bees he has about 30 hives (I think). He's shown me around his hives and I've tasted the honey - it's like a syrup and nice on ice-cream...

Is this run by the council?
 

Steve

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But what if one of their cousins come over for a visit and go to town on me? :eek:
That's one less member for Mark to keep an eye on. :sneaky:
 

stevo

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I went to the native bee workshop today. It was very informative. We started off with an hour or so in the education centre looking at slides and listening to Tim talk. Then we went for a walk to find the first hive, and Tim split the hive ( at the fire tower in the photos). Here was another short session with the slides again and then off to find the second hive in the bush. Tim split that one aswell talking about different things for each hive. The last hive he removed just the top, used the nail board to pearce the honey cells, turned it upside down and the honey flowed out in to the container. Another short slide session and then it they served the honey on icecream.

A very interesting and entertaining day. I talked to quite a few people durig the day, most of them seemed normal.

I only had my phone but the photos show what's going on, i just left the whole lot in there and make a slideshow gallery, here: http://shackers.net/images/photosother/beeworkshopweb/

some samples from the gallery...

There was about 40 people there..


This is a split hive, the bottom on the left, the top is upsidedown on the right. When you split the hive, you put a new top on the base and a newbottom on the top one.



blury photo, but here is Tim with the nail board pearcing the honey cells


 

Mark

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Good stuff - I've had native bee honey on ice-cream it's nice :thumbsup:

Native bee hives are very different aren't they compared to the standard honey bee.

A very interesting and entertaining day. I talked to quite a few people durig the day, most of them seemed normal.
I'm glad most people "seemed normal" :D - funny...
 

stevo

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Yes they did a fair bit of comparing between the honey bee and native bee, like with a honey bee hive you can pull out a frame and see that the bees have capped off the cells and then you can remove that frame and extract the honey and know it's all ready. With the stingless bees some honey cells are ready and some aren't, and there'll be polen cells in there aswell, you just mash it all up and pour out the honey and sift it.

Honey bees fly around 5 - 10 km in their search for polen, Stingless bees only travel 500m away from the hive. So you must have a hive close to your property ;)

and I didn't know that Bats are the main polenators for bananas!

heaps of information that i'll gradually forget over time.

..... there's always a couple of strange ones in group activities.
 

Val.Stewart

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You know....I must be wierd !!

This morning I have been trying to work out how to move a Native Bee hive closer to my house and garden......and now I find this information !!

I very rarely see Honey Bees.....some locals do spray chemicles....you can smell it at times.
Last year I pollinated most of my Jap Pumpkins.....hardly a bee in sight. The little Natives are always around the Hippeastrums when they flower.
Sorry that I didn`t know of this workshop.

Val.
 

stevo

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You know....I must be wierd !!
see, i told ya it's the Dragon Fruit :)

Tim does regular workshops, the next one is on the Gold Coast, might be too far for you, depends how keen you are, here's his event dates: http://www.sugarbag.net/learn-more/

or, for more general information you can visit these sites:
http://www.sugarbag.net
http://www.bobthebeeman.com.au/
http://aussiebee.com.au/

or, although i am no expert, if you just want to discuss stuff here feel free, if i don't know the information we can probably find out, it's all interesting stuff that even non bee people sometimes like to read.

I rarely see honey bees either, i'm not really sure but maybe there's just less locals doing it these days?
 

Val.Stewart

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Stevo......thank you. Wish my dad was here....he was a Honey Bee man......always had about 10 hives......unfortunately he passed away 1979.

Will look at the above Links.....thanks !!

Val.
 
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stevo

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I remember when growing up there was a fella down the road that used to have honey bees, he had the whole verandah of the house full of gear, extractor drums etc and the a few hives in the backyard. I've looked briefly in to honey bees for the backyard but I get the impression it's a fair bit of work and you need lots of gear.
 

David Trees

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Thanks for the string, post and comments. I am interested too in both European and Native Bees. I found that these aweseom little fellas are the main pollinators or tomato and simlar plants as they "Buzz Pollinate". I think water melons might need that too but i cannot be sure of what I read some months ago.
 

stevo

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ooo, a SSC meet up :wave:

The days seem very popular. I wanted to go to a day he was doing near Samford because it was somewhere different, but it booked out pretty quick. I think this one will be full soon.

PS. Have you worked out a nice position in the yard for the new hive?
 
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