Mandarin

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Jnel, Jun 14, 2017.

  1. Jnel

    Jnel Active Member Premium Member

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    Hi, what is the reason for mandarins to be dry and not juicy at all? Previous years fruit has been beautiful.
     
  2. Kasalia

    Kasalia http://retired2006.blogspot.com.au/ Premium Member GOLD

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    Seems odd, my first thought was not enough water over year, or too much nitrogen, picking them too late can also dry them.
     
  3. Jnel

    Jnel Active Member Premium Member

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    Water was my first thought as well, but - been doing everything the same as previous years.
     
  4. Flatland

    Flatland Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Late picking definitely causes them to be dry. This is why a lot of shop bought mandies are dry.
    On the topic of mandies. I have a question too. At my old place had a lovely mandarin tree, produced heaps. They were always juicy but as the years went on they seemed to lose favour. They were still mandie favour but not as intense. Bit the same as the difference between a home grown tomato and a commercially grown. As I have planted a mandarin tree on my new place what to make sure it produces really tasty mandies
     
  5. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Make sure you keep the fruit tree fertilizer up to them.
    If you have been getting unseasonal winter rain, it will leach nutrition from the soil more quickly.
    When seasons are out of sync, it can pay to apply a foliar trace element spray periodically also. Cheap enough to buy & easy to apply to 1 or a few trees with a 1-2lt hand pump spray bottle. Turn the little nozzle til the stream is not quite a jet to get the spray to the top of the tree.
    Check the trunk & branches for signs of canker where the bark might be falling off or just cracking & crumbling open.
    Apply a copper based drench (expensive unfortunately) to all the woody parts of the tree from ground to leaves & on every branch. Mix it in an old ice cream container or similar & use an cheap wide paint brush & dispose of them after second application.
     
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  6. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Great advice ClissAT!
    You're a wealth of handy knowledge - yes these citrus are quite nitrogen hungry and need more feeding than the usual tree.
     
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