Question Limp tomato plants

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Ola, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. Ola

    Ola Member Premium Member

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    Hello

    I'm only new to growing veges and I thought I was going ok, but I'm now having a problem with my tomato plants. Any advice is most welcome!

    I have a garden bed with a few different veges and all are doing well except for my tomato plants. They are all growing but in the last week the leaves have turned limp and are curling downwards. It seems to be mostly the newer growth however a few of the older leaves have some white/yellow tips. Could this be from overwatering? I have 8 plants, different varieties. Some from seed and some I bought as small plants but they are all behaving the same way. There's no sign of fruit yet but I'm new to this so I thought it might be too early. The tallest plant is about 1 metre tall.

    Thanks! 20191126_051333.jpg 20191126_051335.jpg 20191126_051445.jpg 20191126_051540.jpg 20191126_051544.jpg
     
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  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Ola and welcome.
    Tomatoes suffer from heat stress during these excessively hot days with little humidity.
    Its can be caused by lack of calcium which could be due to soil pH being either too alkaline or too acidic.
    Calcium enables water uptake in plants. The longer the stems the more calcium the plants need.
    Otherwise it can simply be from overwatering so the osmosis gets out of whack around the root hairs in the soil.
    But if you withhold water, the plants often fall over anyway.
    Best thing to do is put shade over the plants using a shade sail or shade cloth.
    That reduces the heating to both leaves and soil, alleviating heat stress on both.
    You could tack old shade cloth to the top of the fence behind them and put stakes in along infront of the plants then drape the cloth over them to cover the plants.

    The other thing to do is top the plants to prevent them getting too tall or long. Then once fruiting has commenced, begin allowing laterals to come out from the leave axiels. This keeps the stems as short as possible thereby reducing the need for water and calcium in hot weather.

    My tomatoes and all my veg are well covered with shade cloth in summer.
    I'm about 40k directly west of you in a very dry zone so summer protection is a must for veg.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2019
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