Lime tree roots question

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Paulphot, Jan 17, 2020.

  1. Paulphot

    Paulphot Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi everyone, just looking for some advice. I have an espalier wall with three citrus in it, a Eureka Lemon, a Tahitian Lime and a Meyer Lemon. They are only young but the lime seems to be trying to jump out of the pot it is in (they are in pots to restrict how big they get.
    I suspect the soil in the pot has become over compacted and the roots can't spread so are coming back through the topsoil. Does this sound right? Will I just need to re-pot this or should I remove them all from the pots and just have them in the soil? My concern is the roots will eventually push the retaining wall over if I let them free-range.
    Cheers
     

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  2. Paulphot

    Paulphot Member Premium Member GOLD

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    This is the espalier wall I built, hoping the citrus will eventually screen out some of the back yard.
     

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  3. Wedgetail

    Wedgetail Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Paul the retainer looks pretty solid I wouldn't think the citrus would do to much damage. By keeping them in the pots you will need to feed them and water a lot more often than if they were planted straight into the soil as the roots can't access the nutrients and moisture in the soil and they will end up totally root bound if you want to keep them smaller you can use dwarf trees or keep them pruned to a small size. Does the lime tree just need a layer of soil and mulch to cover the roots or could be root bound as you say can't tell from photo. I am no expert these are just some ideas hope it helps . Regards Dave
     
  4. Paulphot

    Paulphot Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks Dave, I think I'll take the lime out and have a look. I don't want to kill it by taking it out of the pot but if it's goiung to be root bound, it will die anyway.
    Cheers, Paul
     
  5. Wedgetail

    Wedgetail Well-Known Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Don't think you will hurt it by taking it out of its pot you can set back some plants by putting them into to big a pot to soon before they get thier root system sorted. The old saying for lemon trees if they don't grow well pull them out of the ground kick them around the backyard awhile and then replant I wouldn't think a lime would be much different. Wouldn't try it in the middle of summer though. Cheers Dave
     
  6. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    If it's raining at your place this week, now is the perfect time to do this.
    The trees all look very healthy. And your retaining wall looks well built.
    I'd take them all out of the pots and put into the ground.
    Root prune if the roots are matted, clumped tight together and or circling around the inside of their pots.
    Root prune by using clean sharp secutteurs and cut off half the volume of roots.
    You can do that to all three citrus this time.
    In future you would prune the plants themselves according to the espalier method.
    Actually the plants should already be pruned to one leader and remove all side branches below the bottom wire.
    Only keep side branches that align with the wires they will be trained onto. All forward and rearward growing branches should also be removed as they can't be trained onto the wires without bending sharply.
     
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