Ideas for brooders without electric power

Discussion in 'Poultry, Domestic Livestock, Pets, & Bees' started by Lee-Mika, May 14, 2014.

  1. Lee-Mika

    Lee-Mika Active Member Premium Member

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    Any ideas for brooders if you don't have electric power?
     
  2. Johnm64

    Johnm64 Active Member Premium Member

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    G'day Mika, I have used a large esky (cooler box) with hot water bottles when we have lost power. The longest period was only 48 hours though.
    regards John
     
  3. Lee-Mika

    Lee-Mika Active Member Premium Member

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    Now that is an interesting idea. Thank you, John.
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I've moved this to a new thread because it's a really good question and deserves it's own space - sorry for any inconvenience.
    I guess natural brooding is obvious but it does work... About 2 years ago I let one of our hens incubate and brood her own chicks - it was about 10 all up and they could hardly all fit under her bum.

    Brooding is easier than incubating because the temperature can fluctuate a little without too much dramas and as long as the chicks can get to a warm sheltered spot they should be fine. In summer (particularly warm climates) there isn't really a need for a heat source at all.

    The problem with natural brooding, where the chicks are either isolated in a warm area or left with the mother, is the numbers because there's only so many chicks that can be raised this way. Artificial brooding with a light, heat lamp, or other heat source is more productive and controlled.

    Are you planning to incubate with power and then brood without or both incubate and brood without power? I can't imagine how it would be possible to make an effective incubator which doesn't use power - how would the temp be regulated accurately? I'm thinking if you wanted to raise poultry small scale commercial you'd really need a powered brooder; however, if you wanted to breed for your own meat only then you could encourage natural incubation and brooding, but others might have some better suggestions.
     
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