How to grow a ton of radishes (sort of)

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Jack H, Jun 21, 2019.

  1. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

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    So I wanted to experiment a bit and see what would happen if I threw a bunch of radish seeds into one of my fabric pots... take a look :D.



    In the end, an alright harvest for such a small space.
    However due to the competition these plants had with each other I may have maximized the space as much as I could. Which explains why the foliage is quite tall and why there were a lot of little ones.
    These are a little over 6 weeks old


    202E3B5C-6BCC-48E7-8A78-2D297DE04D84.jpeg 3013DB74-39E8-41BD-8024-B160D2719E50.jpeg B257EDFE-3B68-4282-90B4-25B7C64DFC0B.jpeg
     
  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Great little harvest.
    What veg will you try next, Jack?
     
  3. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

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    Got a fair few broad beans in the works which I’m keen for. so far managing to grow about 26 different veges in my small growing space, just trying to figure out ways to maximize growth with the little space I have.
     
  4. Mark Seaton

    Mark Seaton Member Premium Member

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    I threw a bunch of radish into one of my first semi raised garden beds as I wanted something to show for it quickly. Well 3 months later I am still harvesting them, I suppose there is certainly something to be said for over sowing. That way only as you remove the mature ones, the others can finally grow.
     
  5. Jack H

    Jack H Member Premium Member

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    Yeah to be honest that’s the smarter thing to do because now I have about 40 radishes I gotta try and eat haha.
    Initially I was harvesting the outer radishes one by one, but I really just wanted to pull the lot up and use the space for something else.
     
  6. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Jack just some thoughts: I am doing the keto lifestyle so not allowed to eat potatoes :cry: however, ketoers know that repurposing some foods works out great. Radishes: use them like potatoes in chicken stew, fried, roasted I even ground up fresh ones with measured portions of 'riced' cauliflower and wow this is a great combo when cooked up together. My fave may be sliced thin and fried. delicious.
     
  7. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Bea, there are several other root crops you can substitute for ordinary white potatoes.
    All the various sweet potatoes are ok in small amounts, as is yakon (ground apple), water chestnuts too I think, raddish as you say.
    The thing about these other root crops is the way the body handles the carbs (the molecular structure of the carbs is different).
    But I think its still a matter of not mixing them with animal products.
     
  8. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Not sure what you mean i.e. as a soil amendment or as in eating. If the latter i am an omnivore. There are other quasi root vegies that are allowed on keto for those of us not so restrictive - like kohlrabi and turnips/rutabagas. the theory is that they dont actually grow much if at all underground. thing is i dont have much luck with any root crops except carrots ( a no-no except in moderation) even radishes defy me. but most I can buy in the local markets. Daikon radish is practically a perennial and it seems anyone, including brown thumbs like me, can grow it. no one here grows kohlr., turnips or rutabagas.
     
  9. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    :D. Yes I meant eating!
    I don't do any diet version strictly, but every so often I will do several days of some form to mix things up for my body.
    Being an older female well past child bearing years but still carrying the genetic weight of that period, my body rejects all attempts to shed that weight.
    So some of these restrictive diets do shake up the metabolism a bit for a while thus letting go of a kilo or so.
    But after a week the body has gotten used to the new regime and altered its own protective measures!:crazy:

    Yes I find those stronger flavoured root veg rather unpalatable too!
    My mother used to put them in stews which were made in the pressure cooker so the whole meal was permiated by that flavour. Not nice!

    I'd like to see some photos of failed root crops that you have attempted. The fact you can grow carrots means the fertility must be right (low nitrogen) but maybe there are nametodes in your soil that eat or cause misshapen roots.
    Or if you can't get the seedlings to get going into a decent sized plant in the first place, that would indicate not enough nitrogen in the early growth phase. Then here aren't enough leaves to make the necessary energy to develop a root.
     
  10. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hmmm it is all compost made from regular kitchen waste that includes coffee grounds and eggshells , weeds and other greens like borage, peanut shells, occasional addition of goat manure etc and all having been perking for several months. I have also seeded a japanese small turnip that always does well ( infact i pick them, brush them off and eat as am perusing the garden) but radishes are hit and miss, parsnips never come up and as noted have not been able to do any other root veggies. The carrots are just a regular packet picked up at a local ecuadoran supply store or general store. All greens planted germinate - lettuces, brassicas. a beautiful white rose, paste, roma and a local tomato, hot peppers. a local cucumber and imported peas are doing well, alpine and local strawberries. it is all the same general mix in different raised planters according to compatibility. could it just simply be the temp of the soil???? it is subtropical. I think I already noted that I grow daikon radishes very successfully. Maybe the planting depth????
     
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