Question How many edible plants do you grow?

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Steve, Aug 29, 2013.

  1. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    You could simply walk along that coconut tree and pick them :D
     
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  2. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Coco's a nice name.
     
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  3. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

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    Seems appropriate @Ash......its on the consideration list :readit:
     
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  4. Joseph Isaac

    Joseph Isaac Active Member Premium Member

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    @Steve
    Yes. Sometimes they tend to grow like that in the photo. Sometimes they curve while growing but eventually they would straighten up. There are also those rare times when a coconut tree would split into two and both heads would bear fruits.

    @Mark
    Yes. It our case, we are highly encouraged to plant coffee in every coconut tree but that would be expensive. I support your idea too about planting more coffee. Those ripe beans! They smell so good.

    But if you are looking for a fast way to increase your nitrogen content in the soil organically, i would suggest planting mung bean. I dont know if it would live there but it helps. Plus you can harvest and eat the beans!
     
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  5. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks heaps for the info...I asked our local green grocer if he ever got them in so I could try one (but also because they're generally grown from seed if I'm not mistaken Joseph - and I figured that'd be a pretty cheap way to get a plant!) He had to look them up online...wasn't sure when or if he could get them. I think Daley's might stock them periodically.
     
  6. Sanyam

    Sanyam Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Here's my little list: ( Some of these are not even seasonal, I grew them in pots out of silly enthusiasm )
    1. Spinach
    2. Fenugreek
    3. Corriander
    4. Mint
    5. Beans
    6. Chilly (easiest to grow plant in my opinion)
    7. Tomatoes
    8. Bitter Guard
    9. Beetroot (This should be counted as 2, the leaves can replace Spinach leaves in most of the recipes :)
    10. Dragon fruit (Yet to Fruit)
    11. Brinjal (Yet to Fruit)
    12. Guava (Yet to Fruit)
    Then there are some plants bought from nurseries that I have not yet planted in soil - Lemon, Indian plum (Chineese apple/ jujube), Papaya

    ( Napier grass for cattle feed doesn't count right ? :-D )
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Ahh, so that's eggplant? I had to Google it :)
    Definitely! But, such a great plant to grow.
    I haven't grown this before but I see it's a common herb in Indian cooking and highly rated for its medicinal qualities what does it taste like and is it easy to grow?
     
  8. Sanyam

    Sanyam Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Fenugreek seeds are used as spice in very little quantities owing to its slightly bitter taste. Here in India we do use its green leaves as vegetable.

    It is known for its medicinal value. I see lots of people eating a handful of sprouted seeds every morning, specially the diabetic people as it lowers blood sugar and is good for digestive system. WebMD has good information on its health benefits.

    It super easy to grow, hardy, insect resistant and also, its a legume, so it fixed N in your soil as well.

    Note: Seeds loose bitterness on sprouting
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016
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  9. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    That's very interesting - we love Indian food and I do my best to cook Indian as good as I can plus by using as much fresh ingredients from our own garden as possible.

    It's handy to know from you not to over do this plant in cooking and I didn't realise it was classed as a legume I thought it may have been a herb that was left go to seed but I learn something new every day!

    I'm going to buy some seed - I have never seen it for sale locally but some people are selling it on eBay so I'll get it there.

    Thanks :)
     
  10. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I picked up a huge pack of fenugreek at Bunnings...under the micro-greens section with the seedlings. Ummm, I haven't gotten around to planting them yet though! They're mr fothergill's and I've often had trouble getting their seeds to germinate - no idea why! Hadn't realised the medicinal aspect, so might give them a go soon.
     
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  11. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    I got mine in the post but haven't planted/sowed them yet either.

    I've been concentrating on tomatoes I've been raising for a winter crop lately but they're not looking very vibrant at all unfortunately :(
     
  12. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    image.jpg image.jpg Awwww, Mark that's not good...I hate when stuff doesn't grow as you expect despite heaps of time and care.
    Not to rub salt into the wound, but mine are looking and growing great! (IMHO!) these are approx 6 weeks old...a combination of green zebra and tommie toes. I'm kinda cheating as I don't grow full size tomatoes, these seem to be much easier for me (and I'm guessing everyone else)
    Back onto growing stuff out of season, I thought I'd whack in a few zucchinis while I was at it, which I think is way too late/early from memory, but they're going well...Lebanese and golden zucchinis are already flowering! Must be the weird weather we're having.

    image.jpg
     
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  13. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member

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    wow ... everything looks very healthy...

    my vegie garden is looking pretty sad at the moment, I better do some work on it :oops:
     
  14. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Your tomatoes are the mirror opposite to mine @OskarDoLittle yours look perfect!

    I think the soil I got for our new raised beds is too heavy and too strongly mixed with chicken manure, which disappoints me because it was supposed to be "premium" organic garden soil...

    What I think has happened is the seedlings I have transplanted into these beds are being slightly burnt and also not able to take up nutrients correctly plus the weather is cooling down and this doesn't help when growing tomatoes!
     
  15. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I've been told that chicken manure has the highest urea content...which seems fair. I've always been told to use it in compost to allow it to breakdown and be diluted a little, before popping it in the garden. I did once chuck it in the garden as straight poo, and got away with it, but I think that was pretty lucky. I'd have thought tomatoes would cope ok though...maybe check that pH? (Hehehe the old pH chestnut!)
    Maybe add loads of seaweed tonic or worm tea to reduce their stress?
     
  16. OskarDoLittle

    OskarDoLittle Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    What you can't see Stevo is the VERY sad capsicum trying to grow in the brassica patch...companion planting says that's a bad idea...thought I'd test that out...they're right! That capsicum has pretty much died, while the one with the zucchinis is ok. And don't feel too bad about your veggie patch, your photo wall is no doubt much more interesting than mine!
     
  17. Rhonda

    Rhonda Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Gosh seems like forever since I have been in here...We are on 5 acres we only use just over 1 the rest is for the wildlings. Bit slack on the food production but working on it. We have in Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Capsicum, Broad beans, Silver beet, English Spinach, lots and lots of different varieties of cut and come again salad greens,,,several different tomatoes including lots of volunteer plants,,,Asian veges and many herbs. I still have a lot to put in to many to list at this hour of the morning...Have a great day everyone:feedchooks:
     
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  18. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Have you set aside the 4 acres for permaculture purposes @Rhonda such as beneficial insects and animals or are you planning to use more when you get the chance to develop?
     
  19. Rhonda

    Rhonda Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    I am starting a Permicculture corner this weekend coming for the purpose of inviting beneficial insects and creatures to be happy and safe. My main vege area is fenced measures 14 square meteres e have lots of potted vege ect
     
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  20. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Sounds terrific! Our property (only 3 acres) backs onto bushland so we get a lot of natural wildlife but we still keep a section down the back mostly natural - I think it does help the garden in general. :)
     
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