Question Growing Grapes

Discussion in 'Fruit & Vegetable Growing' started by Steve, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

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    I know there's been a thread or two on growing grapes in SEQld on here but they are a little old now.

    Just wondering if anyone has any luck finding a good type that handles the sub-tropical weather?

    I have a nice spot in full sun that would look awesome with some vines on it but don't want something that looks crap, or worse doesn't fruit, as it will be front and centre of view.
     
  2. Letsgokate

    Letsgokate Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Daley's sell a grape vine for tropical climates. They even have a video on it.
     
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  3. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Didn't Mark get a few seasons' worth of good cropping grapes that he showcased on a video here?
     
  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yes, Flame Seedless I saw them for sale at Bunnings last week - fast grower and nice sweet fruit about the size of a 5c piece. I've noticed other varieties coming on the market claiming to have good resistance to powdery mildew (a white one) but I can't remember the name and certain "wine" grapes that I probably would steer clear of as they are probably not great eating whereas the Flame Seedless could potentially be used for both.

    Last season our vine got hit by the birds (those damn Indian minors) and we lost a lot of fruit so I might net ours this year.
     
  5. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I remember many years ago when Opal was the variety to buy for tropical regions.
    But generally they were bitter as lemons.
     
  6. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

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    Good info @Mark, gonna have to check them out.

    The wife is super fussy about her type of grape and will normally only touch the green type.
    My lot in life is to expand her taste and to show her there is more flavours to try.....:eat:
     
  7. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah, the greens seem to last longer also - I'm fond of them too... I'm sure I saw a green type at Bunnings (over our side of town) that claimed to grow well in subtropics.

    Our grape vines are only just starting to grow again...

    grape vine flam seedless starting to grow from bud.jpg
     
  8. Steve

    Steve Valued Member Premium Member

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    I popped into Bunnings today for a quick look and noticed a green one called Menindee Seedless.
    I didn't buy them as I wanted to do some research first.
    Turns out they look like they might work. I might as well give them a go, nothing to lose. And the wife will be happy with green grapes too.
     
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  9. Ash

    Ash Valued Member Premium Member

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    Yeah Steve, the Menindee's are a good and reliable variety. I had a couple of these that put up a good effort in the hard, dry black vertesol but eventually gave up the ghost as I couldn't tend to them in the dryness of our weather the last 18 months or so. But I've re-instated both Menindee and Flame in the current setting in Toowoomba and this should be easier for me to manage.
     
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  10. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi guys ( and of course gals , just a generic term nothing intended) just looking at the grape thing , something I haven't tried yet, previously put off by the mildew thing but obviously varieties have moved along and it seems there are some resistant to mildew at least to some extent . My question is has anyone tried a 50/50. solution of milk/water to combat mildew on grapes. I used it on zucchinis with great success apparently it changes the ph on the leaf surface so the mildew cannot thrive. I am afraid I have a complete aversion to spraying anything remotely poisonous or even unnaturally chemical, I will however succumb to herbal and any other organic methods. I hope to provide healthy plants which can resist insect and disease attacks but that is not always possible . Very keen to try my hand at grapes though and thanks to all for their contributions on this subject , happy planting cheers for now Raymondo
     
  11. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Wasting good milk there Ray!
    It only needs to be 10:1!! :p

    As for applying to grapes, give it a go and report back.
    I have grape vines that would produce some sort of purple grape if the birds would only give them a chance.
    So I haven't had to spray the vines and the fruit don't last long enough.
     
  12. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hi Clissat , thanks for that I get to drink the surplus now , good for the old bones, it might be a while before I can report back haven't got to planting yet , what variety do you grow ? I think we live near each other, had enough of trialling things that are not suitable , prefer a compact producing patch from now on cheers and happy gardening Raymondo!
     
  13. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    No idea Ray, except they are or would be purple if the birds would leave them alone long enough!
    The 2 vines were here when I came here 12 yrs ago but since it is such a bother caring for them, I don't bother.
    They aren't planted in a location where I can easily net them.
    I did consider transplanting the vines to a more suitable place for netting but its it high enough on my want list.
    The vine leaves don't get mildew and as far as I can tell the fruit doesn't seem to either.
    But by the time its beginning to change colour, the fruit starts disappearing.
    At that point it is still very bitter.
    Its probably Opal Black which was popular to plant 20yrs ago, and which was developed for tropical conditions. I think Opal came in Black and white.
     
  14. Raymondo

    Raymondo Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Just wondering if you have tried any fruit protection bags , I believe Green Harvest have a variety of exclusion ideas
     
  15. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    No Ray. Other than throwing a net over the whole vine on the fence which didn't work because some sort of rodent got up under the net!

    Far nicer bigger seedless grapes are available at the fruit shop for not much money if and when I choose to eat grapes.
    These mangy things growing against fences or a shed at my place aren't worth the effort!
     
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