Got Some New Favourite Fruit Trees in the Mail | What Where Why?

Mandy Onderwater

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What do you think?
Have you ever ordered/grown trees before and how did you go?

I have just bought a small lemonade tree after getting inspired. What are your plans in the upcoming seasons?

 

DThille

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I think @Mark needs a scythe for his bog. Alternatively, a mulch path could at least keep his feet dry.

Around here, where we have significant winter, trees are usually shipped bare root in the spring around the time they should be coming out of dormancy. The one place I’ve dealt with (which is local, so I typically pick up rather than having them shipped) wraps the root ball in cedar shavings wrapped in plastic. They sometimes have those water absorbing polymers in there to keep it moist. Typically they advise soaking the root ball for 24 hours before planting.
 

Mandy Onderwater

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I think @Mark needs a scythe for his bog. Alternatively, a mulch path could at least keep his feet dry.

Around here, where we have significant winter, trees are usually shipped bare root in the spring around the time they should be coming out of dormancy. The one place I’ve dealt with (which is local, so I typically pick up rather than having them shipped) wraps the root ball in cedar shavings wrapped in plastic. They sometimes have those water absorbing polymers in there to keep it moist. Typically they advise soaking the root ball for 24 hours before planting.
I think he's realisd he doesn't have the time or perhaps physical ability to scythe. I know my back wouldn't be too happy doing it; whippersnipping is already a pain. And the ride-on barely costs any energy to use. We've got a ride-on mower too and I prefer it over anything, the whippersnipper is just to clean edges I couldn't reach.

That's interesting! I have only ever seen plants shipped in a similar way as how Mark received them. Either that or they get delivered in a tray to your local gardening store in a truck along with the rest of their own shipments.
To be honest, I prefer picking them up personally as I like to see what I buy beforehand.
 

Grandmother Goose

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I've received all my fruit trees in the mail from 4 different nurseries. Most arrived bare root, but a few came in small pots. My most recent addition was two pink lemon trees (eureka lemons that are pink on the inside and the leaves are variegated, very pretty plants). They're common enough in the USA but really hard to get hold of in Australia, I've only found one place that grows and sells them and apparently they're really hard to get a good graft to take for them. I waited 2 years for a new batch to be available to buy, so I grabbed 2 of them whist they were available. One is in it's rightful place in the yard, the other being pot grown as a back up lest the first one doesn't make it, because waiting another 2 years to get hold of a replacement if something goes wrong... I don't have that kind of patience!
 

Jason890

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I planted a white mulberry and a lychee tree few months ago oh and a peach
The peach is supposed to be a warm climate variety so see how it goes
Cheers Jason
 

Grandmother Goose

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I had to google your Eureka Lemons! They look amazing @Grandmother Goose . And if I'm honest that'd probably look amazing when put as a garnish on a drink. Do they taste the same/similar to "normal" lemons?
I haven't tried one yet, will have to wait a couple of years for my trees to start baring fruit, but by all accounts from those that have grown them - most of which comes from the USA - they do taste the same, have the same level of acid, are exactly the same in all ways except for the colouration. I'm interested in making my garden as different as possible, so when I decide I want a fruit tree, I look at all the different varieties of that fruit tree and ask myself, "Can I get this variety at the supermarket? What variety looks different to the norm but still tastes great?" This has resulted in me getting pink lemons, apples that are pink on the inside, peaches that are purple, pears that are tiny, plums, peaches and apples that are huge, cherries that are yellow, and a couple of varieties of apples that are common but taste so much different - and better - when allowed to ripen fully on the tree (rather than being picked too early for transport to the shops). They're still all saplings at present, but as they grow and start to bare fruit I'll write something about each of them here somewhere - either post or article, with photos, etc.
 

Mandy Onderwater

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I haven't tried one yet, will have to wait a couple of years for my trees to start baring fruit, but by all accounts from those that have grown them - most of which comes from the USA - they do taste the same, have the same level of acid, are exactly the same in all ways except for the colouration. I'm interested in making my garden as different as possible, so when I decide I want a fruit tree, I look at all the different varieties of that fruit tree and ask myself, "Can I get this variety at the supermarket? What variety looks different to the norm but still tastes great?" This has resulted in me getting pink lemons, apples that are pink on the inside, peaches that are purple, pears that are tiny, plums, peaches and apples that are huge, cherries that are yellow, and a couple of varieties of apples that are common but taste so much different - and better - when allowed to ripen fully on the tree (rather than being picked too early for transport to the shops). They're still all saplings at present, but as they grow and start to bare fruit I'll write something about each of them here somewhere - either post or article, with photos, etc.
Once grown, let us all know! I bet more on here would be interested :D
 
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