Finally set up

Here is the final bag of cotton (30cm ruler for scale). It still has all the seeds in it. I can spin straight from the seeds but I'm going to separate them so that I can comb it all. Slowly picking the seeds out is something I'll do while watching a movie. I'm finally at the stage where we can move the bed so that we can get rid of the tree, and then reset things up.

Finally set up


I have most beds set up with winter crops, and am already picking zucchinis. It's nice being out there without all the heat.
 
That looks like a lot of cotton. Question, seeing as I know nothing about cotton other than commercial farmers of it up north are perpetually destroying the local water resources further down river here, but that's a whole kettle of literally rotting fish for another time and place... Once processed, spun into thread and woven into a fabric, what size piece of fabric could that much cotton make?
 
Grandmother Goose - I have no idea how much fabric I'll make from this bag of cotton. I'll get this lot spun first and try and work out if I have enough for one meter by three meter length. I definitely don't want to get half way weaving and then run out and have to wait for more to grow.

I grew this cotton in a raised bed. I probably put in too many plants and I'm guessing that I would have more cotton if the plants were more spread out. To be honest, I probably didn't water it as much as the commercial growers do, I tended to forget about it.
 
Grandmother Goose - I have no idea how much fabric I'll make from this bag of cotton. I'll get this lot spun first and try and work out if I have enough for one meter by three meter length. I definitely don't want to get half way weaving and then run out and have to wait for more to grow.

I grew this cotton in a raised bed. I probably put in too many plants and I'm guessing that I would have more cotton if the plants were more spread out. To be honest, I probably didn't water it as much as the commercial growers do, I tended to forget about it.
I can understand why commercial farmers do the things they do, they have to make money which means use less labour, more fertiliser, more pesticides, and do the whole monoculture thing, but they're really not the best practises. I think generally speaking backyard farmers do a better job over all. It's just a pity that our society turned away from backyard farming and relied on supermarkets and big corporations for so long that the little skills like growing, processing, spinning and weaving cotton is lost to most of us. Good on you for doing it. I think more people should (not for me though, it's too akin to sewing and I hate sewing with a passion. :ROFL: )
 
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