Recommend Electroculture

JP 1983

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Because it has been known since the late 18th century that electricity makes plants grow better (watch the first 16 mins).


One French researcher, Justin-Etienne Christofleau, wrote and patented many electroculture devices between 1920 and his death in 1938. He has one [BOOK] (English, printed in Australia?!) which is a very interesting read.

Another similar idea is that discovered by Guido Ebner. He exposed seeds to a gentle electric field. Plant seeds massively increased their yields, and fish eggs (European trout) underwent epigenetic changes to forms which had not been seen in more than 1,000 years. You can read more about that [HERE], book here [German or English] or video [HERE] (6 min).

A German-language setup of Guido Ebner's electroculture apparatus is [HERE].

Comments? Experiments? Do you have seeds/plants that grow better with electricity?
 
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When electricity was discovered and people started learning how to create and use it, all sorts of experiments were done to see what it could be used for, and some of them were pretty weird, and that has never really stopped and people are still doing weird stuff with electricity just to see what happens even today, so this doesn't surprise me in the slightest. But, I think we have enough power consumption problems already without electrifying plants and seeds.

Electrovegetomometer...??? :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL: :ROFL: Ah, humanity, still the best source of daily laughs.
 
But, I think we have enough power consumption problems already without electrifying plants and seeds.
You obviously didn't read Christofleau's book ay? The apparatus act like antenna, absorbing natural atmospheric electricity and redirecting it to plant roots, allowing the crops to grow largely disease and pest free without the use of additional fertilisers. "Power consumption problems" are thus zero because all the power required for the process is drawn directly from the atmosphere to ground for free.

For me this subject is important, because it explains:

1. The weird plants of antiquity discovered by the archaeologists and geologists have nothing to do with evolutionary progeny but rather to do with earth's radically different past electrical environment;
2. Various historical accounts of periods of extreme fruitfulness or famine being potentially caused by earth's largely fluctuating electrical environment;
3. The potential epigenetic origins of Australia's weird "megafauna."

The only thing you need to electroculture your plants is some copper wire coiled into certain antenna shapes, particularly a Fermat spiral at 1.618 ratio (Fibonnacci sequence), pyramids, or something like a lightning dissipator to actually accumulate atmospheric charge and direct it to the plants you want to boost by running wires from the antenna to the root system/soil.
 
You obviously didn't read Christofleau's book ay? The apparatus act like antenna, absorbing natural atmospheric electricity and redirecting it to plant roots, allowing the crops to grow largely disease and pest free without the use of additional fertilisers. "Power consumption problems" are thus zero because all the power required for the process is drawn directly from the atmosphere to ground for free.

For me this subject is important, because it explains:

1. The weird plants of antiquity discovered by the archaeologists and geologists have nothing to do with evolutionary progeny but rather to do with earth's radically different past electrical environment;
2. Various historical accounts of periods of extreme fruitfulness or famine being potentially caused by earth's largely fluctuating electrical environment;
3. The potential epigenetic origins of Australia's weird "megafauna."

The only thing you need to electroculture your plants is some copper wire coiled into certain antenna shapes, particularly a Fermat spiral at 1.618 ratio (Fibonnacci sequence), pyramids, or something like a lightning dissipator to actually accumulate atmospheric charge and direct it to the plants you want to boost by running wires from the antenna to the root system/soil.
You're right, I didn't read the book, I don't have access to a copy of it. I just listened to the videos you linked, or at least tried to, whilst doing other things, and I'm sure I missed a number of pertinent points, so if my tongue in cheek comment about electrifying plants angers you, I'm sorry for that. One of the drawbacks to being human is making errors due to insufficient information that one isn't aware is needed, and generally being not perfect.
 
It is unfortunate when opinions are formed on insufficient evidence.

I'll be getting some copper wire to try some experiments with my pot plants this spring. I've already noticed that my mandarin seedling growing in a terracotta pot is doing much better than the one in the plastic pot (both were planted and sprouted at the same time in 2022 spring); I surmise it is because the plastic is a better insulator against ground currents than terracotta is, therefore the terracotta plant grows better because it conducts slightly more surface current.

By the way, my link to Christofleau's book above links to a free, downloadable copy on the Internet Archive. One doesn't even need to pay for that, either (its pretty short too, less than 80 pages)
 
It is unfortunate when opinions are formed on insufficient evidence.

I'll be getting some copper wire to try some experiments with my pot plants this spring. I've already noticed that my mandarin seedling growing in a terracotta pot is doing much better than the one in the plastic pot (both were planted and sprouted at the same time in 2022 spring); I surmise it is because the plastic is a better insulator against ground currents than terracotta is, therefore the terracotta plant grows better because it conducts slightly more surface current.

By the way, my link to Christofleau's book above links to a free, downloadable copy on the Internet Archive. One doesn't even need to pay for that, either (its pretty short too, less than 80 pages)
There are other factors between terracotta and plastic pots to consider, such as water retention. If you really want to do an experiment with this, get 12 pots exactly the same size, colour and material. Fill them with the same potting mix, and put one seed of the same type from the same seed packet in each. Set aside 6 pots as your control specimens and use the copper wire antenna method around the other 6. Put them all in the same location so they get the same amount of sunlight, wind, rain, etc, and give each pot carefully measured exact amounts of the same types of water and fertilizer at the same times. The reason to use 6 pots for the control and 6 pots for the experiment is to reduce variables like seed health and genetic flaws, and using pots of the exact same type, same water, fertilizer, location gets rid of every other possible variable. If the pots with the copper wire grow significantly better than the ones without, you're onto something.
I admit I am highly sceptical, but I'd be willing to change my mind with sufficient evidence. I'd do the experiment myself except I don't have the space and time for it right now.
 
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I find this very interesting, shame copper wire is soooo expensive here to buy. Already people are stealing power cables to strip the power lines to reclaim and copper and on sell it.
 
I find this very interesting, shame copper wire is soooo expensive here to buy. Already people are stealing power cables to strip the power lines to reclaim and copper and on sell it.
One can use iron/steel or brass wire - it's just a little more exposed to decay (rust, oxidation etc), and somewhat less conductive than copper (and obviously silver and gold, being better conductors than copper, are simply out of the question for expense!). I wouldn't ever use aluminium for a gardening application, humic and fulvic acid in the soil will allow metallic aluminium to leach out and contaminate plants growing in it.

@Grandmother Goose - it's the kind of experiment that deserves 100 plants in both the control and subject arms; alas I don't have that much space right now! I'm of the opinion that water is the primary charge carrier for ground current, so the water permeability of (unglazed) terracotta vs plastic is certainly another factor at play. Anyway I'll use this thread to make updates of any progress.
 
Hai ragione, non ho letto il libro, non ho accesso a una sua copia. Ho appena ascoltato i video che hai collegato, o almeno ci ho provato, mentre facevo altre cose, e sono sicuro di aver perso una serie di punti pertinenti, quindi se il mio commento ironico sulle piante elettrizzanti ti fa arrabbiare, mi dispiace per quello. Uno degli svantaggi dell'essere umani è commettere errori a causa di informazioni insufficienti di cui non si è a conoscenza, e generalmente non sono perfetti.
Ovviamente non hai letto il libro di Christofleau, vero? L'apparato agisce come un'antenna, assorbendo l'elettricità atmosferica naturale e reindirizzandola alle radici delle piante, consentendo alle colture di crescere in gran parte libere da malattie e parassiti senza l'uso di fertilizzanti aggiuntivi. I "problemi di consumo energetico" sono quindi pari a zero perché tutta l'energia necessaria al processo viene prelevata direttamente dall'atmosfera a terra gratuitamente .

Per me questo argomento è importante, perché spiega:

1. Le strane piante dell'antichità scoperte dagli archeologi e dai geologi non hanno nulla a che fare con la progenie evolutiva ma piuttosto con l'ambiente elettrico passato radicalmente diverso della terra;
2. Vari resoconti storici di periodi di estrema fecondità o carestia potenzialmente causati dall'ambiente elettrico ampiamente fluttuante della terra;
3. Le potenziali origini epigenetiche della strana "megafauna" australiana.

L'unica cosa di cui hai bisogno per l'elettrocoltura delle tue piante è un filo di rame avvolto a spirale in determinate forme di antenne, in particolare una spirale di Fermat con rapporto 1.618 (sequenza di Fibonnacci), piramidi o qualcosa come un dissipatore di fulmini per accumulare effettivamente la carica atmosferica e dirigerla verso le piante vuoi potenziare facendo passare i fili dall'antenna al sistema radicale / suolo.
Perché è risaputo dalla fine del 18° secolo che l'elettricità fa crescere meglio le piante (guarda i primi 16 minuti).


Un ricercatore francese, Justin-Etienne Christofleau, ha scritto e brevettato molti dispositivi di elettrocoltura tra il 1920 e la sua morte nel 1938. Ha un [LIBRO] (inglese, stampato in Australia?!) che è una lettura molto interessante.

Un'altra idea simile è quella scoperta da Guido Ebner. Ha esposto i semi a un debole campo elettrico. I semi delle piante hanno aumentato enormemente i loro raccolti e le uova di pesce (trota europea) hanno subito cambiamenti epigenetici in forme che non si vedevano da più di 1.000 anni. Puoi leggere di più su questo [QUI] , prenotare qui [ tedesco o inglese ] o video [QUI] (6 min).

Una configurazione in lingua tedesca dell'apparato di elettrocultura di Guido Ebner è [QUI] .

Commenti? Esperimenti? Hai semi/piante che crescono meglio con l'elettricità?


Because it has been known since the late 18th century that electricity makes plants grow better (watch the first 16 mins).


One French researcher, Justin-Etienne Christofleau, wrote and patented many electroculture devices between 1920 and his death in 1938. He has one [BOOK] (English, printed in Australia?!) which is a very interesting read.

Another similar idea is that discovered by Guido Ebner. He exposed seeds to a gentle electric field. Plant seeds massively increased their yields, and fish eggs (European trout) underwent epigenetic changes to forms which had not been seen in more than 1,000 years. You can read more about that [HERE], book here [German or English] or video [HERE] (6 min).

A German-language setup of Guido Ebner's electroculture apparatus is [HERE].

Comments? Experiments? Do you have seeds/plants that grow better with electricity?

Agriculture has always dealt with chemistry, but the most important thing is physics: energy. We don't know what it is but it moves everything and water is the vehicle that stores and transports it. Magnetic, electromagnetic, solar energy, heat, sounds, colours, etc. are frequencies that act on organisms such as geopathies which are negative energies. Plants are, being stationary living beings, sensitive to energies and so are soil and edaphon. Unfortunately with the green revolution they covered up these discoveries to sell fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. I apologize if the writing is not perfect, but I used the Google translator.
 
I think that my initial reacting was the same as Grandmother Goose, not going to lie. But I think that it's exactly why this forum is so good, we all educate one another. It's very interesting to see what other people's take on things are.
 
This is quite interesting. I doubt there's much to it myself (mostly because of the small amount of electricity involved), but I would have the utmost respect for anyone who might actually try it and do a proper scientific comparison with control plants.

It reminds me of a story my father told me once, when he was working for the local hydroelectric power station in the 1980s. Back then employees got free electricity, so one of them buried a bunch of heaters in his garden with the idea that he could grow his crops all year round. They cottoned onto him though and put a stop to it when it snowed in the middle of winter and his place was the only one with no snow and green grass!

Another time I remember him telling me of an experiment he did, by running mains power through the ground across a few metres of the garden. Apparently not much at first, but then a few moments later hundreds of worms came wiggling up to the surface. They sure didn't like the extra electricity!
 
electrical current in soil could affect numerous things ionization of water particles and break them to their free form of oxygen and hydrogen in soil and i would and change how the metallic bonds of salts ( aka nutrients and trace minerals ) bonded to other form in the soil. So in theory it may have some foundation in the process. It's know areas where a direct strike of lightening the nitrates amounts increase in soil because the charge bonds nitrogen in atmosphere to the rain droplets to form of mild nitric acid which and in turn it shift to a higher nitrate content , and phosphorus amounts also increase as a direct result of a lightening strike, Scientific America magazine did an article almost 15 years ago about it called spark of life. These are extreme high voltage and current compared to the electro culture where the lower voltages may or may not stimulate any change.
 
The internet archive has a copy of christofleau's book on electroculture. Look it up
 
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