Dragon fruit (pitaya)

Ash

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That's dedication, growing them from seed.
This is all new to me. The disshevelled tree supporting or granny flat needs a little love, so I'll be looking into those videos (as well as yours Mark) to get them to fruit. Nice work you guys!
 

OskarDoLittle

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Well, now you're just showing off! ;)
I'm so jealous - I have an enormous pot waiting for my DFs, I'm not game to plant them until they're big enough though...tried it with a couple of little guys and they just died. Maybe it's actually not such a bad thing that I've got another 50-60 seedlings!
 
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Mark

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I do think established dragon fruit cuttings grown in a pot first have a better survival rate but I suppose that's true for most plants.

I've never tried direct sowing pitaya seeds where they are to grow so I wonder if that work ok?
 

Mudmaker

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My partner brought two pitaya a few weeks ago which are in small pots so we are looking at planting them out. I am a bit concerned that if we plant them in the ground the roots could be invasive and difficult to remove if need be so was thinking that maybe we should just put them into a larger pot. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

Mudmaker

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We are looking at planting them in our garden bed which receives about six hours of full sun and dappled shade the rest of the day. We have hardwood stakes etc all ready to put in so I’m really pleased that they are not invasive, I would much rather have them in the ground than in a pot.
 
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Mark

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Here's an update pic of my growing dragon fruit in a pot raised on a stump experiment.
dragon fruit vine in a pot.jpg


You can see the difference from my earlier post Dragon fruit (pitaya) on how much it has grown and the extra shoots from the top obviously it's pretty happy in this position. I just water it occasionally when I remember and the hope is it will grow down and flower next season making a nice ornamental edible dragon fruit artwork :)
 

OskarDoLittle

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image.jpg
And by comparison, my seedlings are now 2cm! :) the ones I left crowded in quite a large pot seem to be doing better than the 8 or so that I transplanted into their own pots. So I'm just going to keep thinning them out until I have about 4-5 left.
 
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Joseph Isaac

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They say the soil acidity in ph level should be atleast 7. Anything lower than that and the plant's ability to produce fruits is greatly affected.
 

Mark

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So that's pretty high isn't it! I'm not much of a soil tester gardener (which might not be smart) so I'm not very knowledgeable on ph levels but 7 seems on the verge of extreme isn't it?
 

Ash

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pH 7 is neutral, Mark. Neither acidic nor basic (alkaline).

every unit deviation from 7 means 10 times the concentration of acid (H+) or base (OH-) molecules than that of pure water. This page gives you real world examples of what kind of substances fall in the various pH levels.

As an example, seawater has a pH of 7.5-8.5 and my slightly brackish bore water has a pH of 9, which is 100 times the amount of hydroxide (in the form of bicarbonate) compared to that of pure water. That can be harsh on plants, but I'm giving it a go with some sulphur to neutralise it.
 

Mark

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For some reason I always thought, 6.5 was neutral in a range between 6-7 but that's probably because many plants like it around 6.5 - I'm still never going to turn into a soil testing nerd no matter what anyone says :p
 

Ash

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That's about as much as you need to know about it Mark, so don't sweat it!
If pH is found to be less than 6, a bit of garden lime might help, and if higher than 7.5 in general then sulphur may be needed to provide a balance to the soil. That's about it (except for azaleas that have different coloured flowers based on soil pH).
 
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Sanyam

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I wonder if dragon fruits can do well on raised beds in areas where the underlying soil has moisture coming from near by water body?!! I do not see any information regarding the root's depth and breadth span on the internet. Any pointers?
 

Mark

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I do not see any information regarding the root's depth and breadth span on the internet. Any pointers?
Root depth isn't very deep but the roots can wonder a few metres out from the plant. They definately don't like wet feet but if you grow them in raised beds with free draining soil extra moisture shouldn't worry the vines because they are adapt to higher rainfall areas such as the tropics and rainforests.

In a way, dragon fruit are an odd cactus whereby they do like lots of water but are also drought tolerant.

I think your plants will grow well for you - that's my hunch.