Featured DIY'ish Worm Farm

Discussion in 'Building DIY, Machinery & Tools' started by Burga, Feb 10, 2020.

  1. Burga

    Burga Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I just purchased a Tumbleweed Worm Cafe from the big green shed. I know it not exactly DIY but there is some minor assembly required so im calling it DIY'ish :thumbsup:.

    While we have only had it a few days now and new to worm farming we are happy with the product and ease of use, the kids are almost fighting over who gets to feed the worms in the evening.

    We used to throw away the food scraps like alot of urban households. It will take several months to see the rewards from the worm farm but the main goal is to minimise the purchase of liquid fertilisers and utilise the worm tea and castings in the veggie garden instead.

    If any one has any good tips on creating a successful worm farm i would appreciate the info.

    20200208_154613_copy_756x1008.jpg

    If this post is in the wrong area please place in appropriate section

    Edited to reduce photo size
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
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  2. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member

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    Feed it little and regurarly. Dont overload it with lots of stuff or things will start to ferment. During the first few months things will be slow until the worm population builds. We dont rate our worm farm by how much castings we get, rather by all the free worm juice we get out of it.

    I think I saw a video by Costa a few months ago saying that most worm farms like yours only take about a lunchbox full of stuff each week. I add a few cabbage/broccoli/cauli leaves shredded by hand every other day and they worms keep up nicely. Oh and all the banana peels that the kids generate.

    All in all, they are my favorite pets. They dont bark, poo all over the lawn but actually earn their keep unlike my lazy greyhound LOL
     
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  3. Burga

    Burga Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Hahaha

    That particular worm farm has 2 more trays to add in, as the first tray fills add the second and start that as the feed tray and then onto the third one. Empty original as the third fills then keep rotating through as the last tray fills, well thats what ive made from the couple tutorial videos i watched.
    It was mentioned that with an active farm properly managed there could be 10,000 in there. Is this realistic do you think?
    Apparently should eat half their collective body weight a day and 1000 worm starter pack said 250gm a day to start.
    Either way the kids are having fun, we are not putting all scraps in landfill and the worm tea will be the best benefit of it.

    The kids have plenty of banana peels to throw in there. :)
    Ill have a look around to see if i can find the Costa video.
    Appreciate your tips @Fergzter
     
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  4. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    These farms should work quite well but I'm concerned about it being black in our summers.
    So to keep the internal temperature relatively in the right range, I would cover the whole setup with sacks or an old blanket folded.

    Also could I please mention the actual photo size.
    It's waaay too big! ;)
    Mark has some guidelines written up about photo sizes etc.
    Basically if you are using a phone, reduce your photo size to medium or small or whatever the setting is that's a bit less than 'fine'.
     
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  5. Burga

    Burga Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I have edited the photo, if you could tell me if this is still too large?.
    I did upload from my mobile so will have to keep an eye on this. Appreciate the heads up.

    I will look at putting few damp hessian bags over it. Where it is currently located down the side of the house it does not receive any direct sunlight so that is a good start.
     
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  6. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Thanks, that photo seems good now.
    I have a free app on my tablet called 'Reduce Photo Size' which I often use which can reduce to a whole heap of different sizes.
    I just go for a size about 750-1000pix wide/high.
    That usually also reduces significantly the overall volume of the pix from several mb to around 700-800 kB for no decrease in quality.
     
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  7. Burga

    Burga Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Yeah i have similar app to that and i reduced to 756x1008 and came in at 295kb from 3.95mb. I probably should have checked originally :facepalm:
     
  8. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member

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    It wouldnt surprise me that there could be 10,000 once you have 3 trays humming along.

    I found the 250g per day at the start to be a case of "under ideal condidions" which didnt quite meet up to reality. But as always, you results may vary. I find over summer in our area the activity in the farm accelerates considerably, then slows right down over winter. We have very cold winters here (for Australia) where max temps are usually well under 10°C.

    I am about to start a second farm out of a 400L esky that broke a few years ago. Might have to post about that when I get around to it.
     
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  9. Burga

    Burga Active Member Premium Member GOLD

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    I would be interested in seeing your project when you get around to doing it, upcycling an old esky should be a cool project.
     
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  10. Karen&Luke

    Karen&Luke Member Premium Member

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    Oh I'm glad you posted this. Our place we just bought has a worm farm similar to yours. But it's empty and I want to set it up in the near future. Just want to make sure I know how to care for them first.
    I also saw a video about burying pvc pipe into the ground and putting food scraps in there. Like a direct ground compost? I may look into that idea as well.
     
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  11. Fergzter

    Fergzter Active Member Premium Member

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  12. Albert

    Albert Member Premium Member GOLD

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    Great photo! really glad you posted this, I'm in need of starting my own worm farm. Well Done!
     
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