Chicken being bullied

Discussion in 'Poultry, Domestic Livestock, Pets, & Bees' started by stevo, Mar 27, 2015.

  1. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member GOLD

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    I have four chooks, one is being picked on a bit. We can't blame the victim?... but it looks like the little chook doesn't know when to walk away or doesn't know chicken body language, as she'll hang around the big bully and when she's pecked she just puts her head down and takes the pecking instead of running away. I got home yesterday and there was a few feathers around on the ground so looks like she was hassled a bit during the day. The little chooks also insists on sleeping beside the big bully and gets pecked while they are settling for the night.

    I'm thinking, I might separate the big bully out from the rest for a day or two.

    any thoughts?
     
  2. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yes, separation does work Stevo.

    I have my isolation pens primarily for this purpose and whenever I see a hen getting picked on too much ie significant loss of feathers or bleeding comb I put her in the pen for at least a week (sometimes two) by this time her feathers are growing back and the bullies have forgotten why they decided to pick on her. When she is let back out the bullying rarely starts again and usually this solves the problem completely.

    If possible, make your isolation pen within your pen so you are not "removing" the hen out of sight from the others just separating her for a small time. The isolation pen doesn't have to be very big at all either...
     
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  3. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member GOLD

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    yeah i'll give it try this weekend. I don't really have an isolation pen, but I can separate them by putting a temporary fence in.

    I thought about chicken phsycology, and maybe if I took out the bully, then the victim chook may bond better with the others, and it would make the bully the outsider, so when the bully returns they would have to fit in again. I don't know... i'm sure i'm making it complicated, but hey.. I blame the Friday night burbons :blush: :hysterical:
     
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  4. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Yeah, a temporary barrier would do the trick nicely! I guess you could separate the bully for a short period and see if that works - it could... Stick her in the naughty corner :D
     
  5. stevo

    stevo Backyard Farmer Premium Member GOLD

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    I separated them with a dividing fence within the chick coop. They stand around looking at each other and the fence, wondering what it's all about. Seems to work so far.
     
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  6. Mark

    Mark Founder Staff Member

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    Chickens... :rolleyes:

    See how it goes hey!
     
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