Banana tree help

Kitty

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Feb 7, 2020
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Hi All,

Just planned this dwarf Cavendish banana a few days ago and it's looking a bit sick. I followed all of the planting instructions, but I'm not sure if it's suffering a bit of shock from planting or if there's something else that I've done wrong. Any tips would be appreciated.

PS please ignore the weeds, the house has been empty for 2 years and I'm slowly, very, very slowly trying to clear the weeds ‍♀ lol
20200328_092048_20200328101956499.jpg
 
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Wedgetail

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Sep 22, 2019
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Hi Kitty you can try taking off 2 or 3 of the lower leaves this will ease the stress on the plant and give it a good drink it may take a week or so for it to settle in but generally it doesnt look to bad. Dave
 

Kitty

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Feb 7, 2020
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Arid, Desert, or Dry
Thanks Dave, I have trimmed off a couple of the leaves and given it a good watering as you suggested. How much/often water would you recommend for an arid climate? I know other people grow bananas around here, but unfortunately I know nothing about growing them (it was an impulse buy from bunnings lol)
 

Wedgetail

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I give mine a bucket every couple of days until it gets established then go out to 2 buckets ever 4 days . Hope this helps Dave.
 

ClissAT

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Bananas transpire prolifically through their leaves.
If your humidity is down as it most likely will be in an arid climate, that transpiration rate has to be refilled by adding water.
The more water you give it the more fertilizer and trace elements it will need as well.
I would double the fertilizer and trace elements for its first year.
If ever you see a leaf sagging like those in the photo, give it a bucket of water asap.
They love, love, a heap of nitrogen which can come from many sources including a night stroll! ;):p

Build a tall mound offset around it by using that place as your compost area. You want the current tree to end up on one side of the mound. Put small branches, scraps, pruned leaves, hay, wood chips, old potting mix, whatever you can find. And keep adding to it. Eventually you want a mound circle 3m wide so next year when it makes a pup, you can cut the pup off and plant it on the other side of the mound. The traditional method of growing bananas is to have 3 plants a year in age apart. Remove and give away all other pups. Dwarf Cavs are the best so no-one will turn down a free pup. Then as they fruit you only have one bunch maturing at a time. If you and your family eat tons of bananas, you will need 3 mounds each with 3 plants. So you will have 9 plants in total.
The best situation to plant them when there is a chance of low temperatures is against a north facing brick or shed wall. They really need protection from wind, desicating strong winds and extra high temps and low temps and frosts.
 
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