Aussie Bush Tucker - An Introduction to Common Native Foods of Australia

I'm slowly making my way back through my articles to add Distribution Maps under the "Habitat and Range" section of each article. These have been completed for parts 8-13 so far. The goal of this change was to permit folks to gauge plant distribution from an actual map of Australia with verified, recorded reports of plant locations. All maps were sourced from the Atlas of Living Australia.

I've also made some expansions to the article on native parsnips (new research has enlightened me to additional edible species with increased range). I hope to expand that article with some additional new pictures as soon as I can get around to it. The other articles have been subjected to some minor edits here and there to add new information, correct spelling and grammar and tidy some things up.
 
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I'm slowly making my way back through my articles to add Distribution Maps under the "Habitat and Range" section of each article. These have been completed for parts 8-13 so far. The goal of this change was to permit folks to gauge plant distribution from an actual map of Australia with verified, recorded reports of plant locations. All maps were sourced from the Atlas of Living Australia.

I've also made some expansions to the article on native parsnips (new research has enlightened me to additional edible species with increased range). I hope to expand that article with some additional new pictures as soon as I can get around to it. The other articles have been subjected to some minor edits here and there to add new information, correct spelling and grammar and tidy some things up.
I noticed the maps! I think it's a lovely idea as it allowed me to figure out if something might grow near me!

I'll definitely look over the articles again! Though I enjoy scrolling through them regularly :)
 
Lomandra article Update: Added an important caution on two common but poisonous ornamental look-alikes, Dietes and Liriope. Pictures to follow when I have more time to edit them in (unfortunately I ran out of time this morning due to hours spent reading a recent Fair Work Commission decision affecting my workplace!)

Distribution maps have been added for parts 2-6 (just part 7, native Plantain, and the new articles to follow, remain to have distribution maps added).
 
Part 14 - Native Limes [LINK]

Also updated Part 10 - Native Parsnips with more images of other common species, especially the inland and Western Australian varieties.
 
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Updated the Plantain page with new medicinal information:
Medicinally, plantain is a go-to field anti-inflammatory and mild topical antibiotic. Leaves can be crushed or chewed and applied as a poultice directly to any kind of minor cut, abrasion, sore or insect bite. Secure the poultice in place with a bandage or gauze. Reapply every 3 hours or as needed. Plantain poultices will draw toxins out of bites, including snake, spider and bee, wasp or hornet stings, although some venoms have faster or slower courses of action and may require urgent or specialist treatment. A tea made from plantain leaves (1 tsp dried or 1 tbs fresh), twice per day, is reputed to alleviate leaky gut and digestive issues.
I'm looking to complete my article on native grapes (water vine) tomorrow.
 
Updated article 13 - Sarsparilla.

Added a photograph of a halved, ripe fruit which I successfully found on a foraging trip this morning. It's not really sars fruit season but sometimes nature surprises you!

Also updated instructions for making sarsparilla leaf tea after conducting some experiments this afternoon. Leaves are best torn, bruised and then steeped in boiled water. It's quite nice, actually! Sars leaf tea is mild and sweet. It does not really taste like strong sars root beer or soda at all.
 
Updated Article 13 - Native Sarsparilla - with a photo of sarsparilla leaf tea, which I recently used alongside high dose vitamin A, C, D, K2, zinc, magnesium, and low dose chromium and selenium to recover from a bout of 'flu in just 4 days (tested negative to 'rona 4 times *shrug*).

Article 16 - Native Figs is almost ready for publication, probably this weekend. It's been a rather fun number of expeditions to find samples for photography. I had a hard time finding ripe fruits, especially the sandpaper figs, but some of the Port Jackson and Moreton Bay figs are fruiting at the moment (and there are several HUGE trees where I park my car for work, so I will sample and update as they ripen; gotta fight the damn bats for the ripe ones grrrr).
 
Updated Article 5 - Lomandra with a new photograph of female flowers. Also made some edits to the text, especially for seed preparation processes (drying the seed heads is far superior to soaking!)

Article 17 - Bolwarra is underway and hopefully I'll have time to have that up by the weekend. I'm apprehensive to post because, though I have found these fruits in the bush food garden at Mt. Annan, I have not yet tasted them; they were not ripe at the time I found them and this series is supposed to be about common bush foods that I have personally tried!

The same goes for Article ? - Davidson Plums, which I am thinking of postponing until nearer to the end of this series (which could be years away as I still have heaps of material to cover, places to go, plants to find and photograph). They're not a particularly common fruit in the bush, in fact they're extremely rare and endangered, but quite a few nurseries stock them nowadays and they're easily propagated from seed. So I don't know whether to include them or not... probably not yet anyway.

Future edits I hope to roll out in the coming months include adding a "Key Identifiers" section for at-a-glance identification with bullet-point features. These will be the must-tick identifying features to be sure you're dealing with the intended species and not others.
 
Added Article 19 - Samphire/Glasswort [LINK]

I have also begun the process of updating past articles with Key Identifying Features bullet points for ease of use, and some articles will be getting some new pictures. I found Cissus antarctica growing in the park next to my house! And its in flower!!! Grapes soon!!!!!!
 
That's amazing :D
I'll be travelling to and from Brisbane soon, so hopefully I can scout out some plants (if I can catch a break from my family, haha).
 
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