Amarylis and Other bulbs

Discussion in 'Other' started by Bea, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member

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    Hi all. today I planted my amarylis bulb. It has been laying dormant in a pot, outside, for a few months, and has received some sun thru out the day. when i shook off the dried up matter it has a healthy white onion type of bulb. I planted it in the dirt with a bit of compost this morning and with about an inch of the bulb showing. what do you think will happen. I left the roots intact. These bulbs are quite expensive by Ecuador standards so i wont get another until I am sure I can re=start it.
     
  2. ClissAT

    ClissAT Valued Member Premium Member GOLD

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    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippeastrum

    I know them as hippeastrums and I have 100s of bulbs in several different cultivars and flower colours in my garden.
    What colour is yours?
    I never dig them up because here there's no need, they don't rot.
    I shuddered a bit when I read that you allowed the bulb to become descicated, because there is no need.
    If you have problems with them rotting in wet soil in the winter just lift them and brush them off then store in a labelled paper bag in a dark place.
    I hope your bulb regrows. They are strong so it should, but it may not flower if too much energy was removed during the descication.
    They need to be left in the ground after flowering until the leaves go yellow then wither and die naturally because the bulb pulls back the nutrients being made in the leaves to form the new flower for next year.
    Once the leaves have died naturally, then its ok to lift them if necessary because next years flower will have been formed deep inside the bulb.
    The bulb needs to be planted so its top is a bit deeper than its total height. For most bulbs thats the normal planting depth.
    If it continues to get sun and dry off ontop it may not live.
    So pull it up, dig a bit deeper hole, remove the old roots with sharp scissors close to but not too close to the dried skin and replant.
    Hippies tolerate poor soil but don't like to dry out completely, especially the newer cultivars. The older heritage types will generally tolerate drying out in winter, even under snow but not desert conditions.
    To get them to multiply, they need better soil and to be left in the ground permanently.
    Mine multiply like crazy! I end up with huge bulbs about 4inches(10cm) across and in clumps of several so big and thick it is hard to dig them up.
    Each of those massive bulbs will produce a stem of 6 flowers plus another within weeks of 4 flowers. However, then they will most likely die but will have multiplied several times over the previous 3-4yrs and have many pups around them.
    I've also crossbred some and developed my own flower, a pink stripped white flower with feathery edges on the petals.
    Once you have a few flowers coming on, the flower should produce seed pods full of papery black flat seeds. They grow easily enough but take 3yrs to flower if left in the ground. They transplant easily too.
    Here's some of mine flowering mid spring.

    hippies smaller pic.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
  3. Bea

    Bea Active Member Premium Member

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    Beautiful photo.

    thank you. Never in my life heard of planting an Amaryllis so deep! In Vancouver BC we never lifted bulbs, including Lillies because the ground never froze. But Amaryllis was still treated as a once year beauty, indoors at Xmas. So maybe I goofed. I was relatively successful at getting them to re flower the following fall (in N Amer). and people generally had only one plant - seriously. Going into the dry season means a not quite desert like condition for a couple of months. I am now concerned that I have not planted it in a dry enough spot - difficult in my yard - but not a serious problem until about November. Note that I said that it looks like a big white onion that has been pealed.
    BTW I have an asiatic Lily that has just finished flowering in the pot and wondering what to do. Again, In Vancouver I would just lift from the pot, plant, enjoy and lift and divide the plant when it looked crowded. I was frankly a bit stunned to see the lily at a local nursery.
     

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