Check out my turmeric!

Ash

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Spectacular result Mark. They look so healthy and seem to thrive in that environment. I'm sure it would taste great in cooking as well.
 

bearded1

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There's a lot of great anti-cancer food right there. Curcumin, one of the chemicals in turmeric seems to at least prevent cancer and possibly be a treatment (more research needed) -From http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/abo...r-questions/can-turmeric-prevent-bowel-cancer

Research into preventing cancer
A phase I clinical trial looked at giving curcumin to 25 patients with pre cancerous changes in different organs. This study seemed to show that curcumin could stop the precancerous changes becoming cancer.

Research has also shown that there are low rates of certain types of cancer in countries where people eat curcumin at levels of about 100 to 200 mg a day over long periods of time.
 
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charina

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Thats it. I am planting turmeric this year. Turmeric has great health effects. I saw a news reel about a year ago and decided to give it a try. I have hereditary joint inflamation issues and so does my daughter. Every morning i make green shakes and add turmeric root to it. Since starting this practice i stopped antiinflamatories meds and never loocked back. Since it is not a magic pill it took about a month for it to start working. But oh boy is it worth it.
 

Mark

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Yeah, I've always been a turmeric lover in cooking but it wasn't until I started growing it before I researched and found how amazingly healthy it is to eat! I started all these plants from one rhizome a few seasons back and have found growing turmeric quite easy to do.

It's a late starter (about mid-spring) but once it gets going it really takes off and looks good in the garden too. Each year I just dig it up take what I need and replant the roots with a good hit of new compost and possibly a little manure or organic fertiliser.

Grinding it up to make powdered turmeric is also pretty straight forward http://www.selfsufficientculture.com/threads/i-made-some-organic-turmeric-powder-spice.618/
 

Steve

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I can't say I've ever see a turmeric plant before but I like what I see.
It's really a great looking plant.

Is it similar to ginger to grow Mark?

And I spy an entrenching tool too. Handiest bit of kit I have I think. A mate was throwing one away a couple of months back so I snatched it up straight away. How else am I to measure the width of my firing pit? :crazy: :D
 
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Mark

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Is it similar to ginger to grow Mark?
Identical in the way it's grown for sure - very easy because like most root plants they already have a reserve to give themselves a good start so unless it's plonked into a dry bed with no nutrients it should grow just about anywhere.

Handiest bit of kit I have I think. A mate was throwing one away a couple of months back so I snatched it up straight away. How else am I to measure the width of my firing pit?
:D Yes it is Steve :chuffed: I have about 3 (or 4) and they are so tough and versatile for a gardening tool or a fox hole! If only my ET could talk we'd have some great reminiscing conversations about my old Army days - at the moment it's just a one way conversation with me talking to him whilst I hammer his beak into the garden bed... :confused::)
 

MarkU

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Mark, g'day mate. I have just put some tumeric in but have a good little patch of ginger going as well. I have been searching around for a tip on when it is ready or best to harvest i assume that ginger and tumeric would both mature and be ready to harvest the same way?
 

Mark

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i assume that ginger and tumeric would both mature and be ready to harvest the same wa
Hey mate! Great to hear from you Undies :twothumbsup:

Yeah, both turmeric and ginger can be harvested early when the top growth is still growing (they call it young ginger/turmeric)... or, you can wait until the plants have died back and harvest - this is the most typical way.

Turmeric and ginger keep well in ground so I only dig up some when I need it and then before spring I dig the remaining rhizomes up, divide them, give the bed a heap of compost plus fertiliser, and replant for the new season - they tend to sprout around mid-spring and then should be well underway by start of summer.
 

MarkU

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Thanks mate I'm pretty keen to try some stuff with young ginger but will leave most in to mature and harvest later
 

Bea

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Turmeric flower - not a great shot but it is a nice flower.

View attachment 1324
Mark I dont have such a large gorgeous patch - yet - but I have had at least one root stock flower if planted with lots of compost. it is so beautiful that I think this is worth cultivating for the flower as well. however, i did find that the tubers were a bit smaller. what about you? and I also dry out and make my own powder. But, I find that I must leave both the tumeric and ginger for a long time and then throw in the oven, lowest setting (gas) with door open overnight. Even in the driest weather they tend to sprout. dont know if this damages the tubers nutritional value.
I did read that I might be doing it wrong. I have a hanging air dryer that faces south and will be putting the tubers in that to see what happens peppers, flowers and seeds seem to dry quite crisp. I just learned the hard way that I need to collect and dry before the rains start. Nothing dries very well in the humidity. Duh!